Roy Lichtenstein

Works of art

Roy Lichtenstein, "Nude Reading", Corlett 288

Roy Lichtenstein

(Manhattan 1923 - 1997 Manhattan)

"Nude Reading"

aus der Serie "Nudes" (C 282 - 290)

Reliefdruck 1994

77,5 x 92,3 cm Abb. 60,7 x 77,1 cm

sign. num. dat.

Auflage 79 Exemplare

Corlett 288

[23454]

Roy Lichtenstein, "Landscape 7", Corlett 57

Roy Lichtenstein

(Manhattan 1923 - 1997 Manhattan)

"Landscape 7"

aus der Serie "Ten Landscapes" (C 51-60)

Farbsiebdruck mit Collage 1967

27,3 x 46,4 cm

sign. num. dat.

Auflage 110 Exemplare

Corlett 57

[23418]

Roy Lichtenstein, "Landscape 10", Corlett 60

Roy Lichtenstein

(Manhattan 1923 - 1997 Manhattan)

"Landscape 10"

aus der Serie "Ten Landscapes" (C 51-60)

Farbsiebdruck und Collage 1967

39,2 x 42 cm

sign. num. dat.

Auflage 110 Exemplare

Corlett 60

[23411]

Roy Lichtenstein, "La Nouvelle Chute de l'Amérique", Corlett 267-276


Roy Lichtenstein, "La Nouvelle Chute de l'Amérique", Corlett 267-276


Roy Lichtenstein

(Manhattan 1923 - 1997 Manhattan)

"La Nouvelle Chute de l'Amérique"

(The New Fall of America)

Vollständiges Mappenwerk mit 10 Aquatintaradierungen 1991/92

50 x 37 cm

sign. num. dat.

Auflage 125 Exemplare

Corlett 267-276

[23410]

Roy Lichtenstein, "Illustration for "Amérique"", Corlett 267

Roy Lichtenstein

(Manhattan 1923 - 1997 Manhattan)

"Illustration for "Amérique""

aus "La Nouvelle Chute de l'Amérique" (The New Fall of America)

Farbaquatintaradierung auf Arches 1992

48,1 x 35,4 cm Pr. 37,5 x 27,9 cm

sign. num.

Auflage ca. 175 Exemplare

Corlett 267

[23328]

Roy Lichtenstein, "Illustration for "Hüm Bum!"", Corlett 274

Roy Lichtenstein

(Manhattan 1923 - 1997 Manhattan)

"Illustration for "Hüm Bum!""

aus "La Nouvelle Chute de l'Amérique" (The New Fall of America)

Farbaquatintaradierung auf Arches 1992

48,1 x 35,4 cm Pr. 37,5 x 27,9 cm

sign. num.

Auflage ca. 175 Exemplare

Corlett 274

[23332]

Roy Lichtenstein, "Illustration for "De Denver au Montana, Départ 27 Mai 1972" (I)", Corlett 275

Roy Lichtenstein

(Manhattan 1923 - 1997 Manhattan)

"Illustration for "De Denver au Montana, Départ 27 Mai 1972" (I)"

aus "La Nouvelle Chute de l'Amérique" (The New Fall of America)

Farbaquatintaradierung 1992

35,5 x 48,2 cm Pr. 28 x 37,7 cm

sign. num.

Auflage ca. 175 Exemplare

Corlett 275

[23874]

Roy Lichtenstein, "Illustration for "De Denver au Montana, Départ 27 Mai 1972" (II)", Corlett 276

Roy Lichtenstein

(Manhattan 1923 - 1997 Manhattan)

"Illustration for "De Denver au Montana, Départ 27 Mai 1972" (II)"

aus "La Nouvelle Chute de l'Amérique" (The New Fall of America)

Farbaquatintaradierung auf Arches 1992

48,1 x 35,4 cm Pr. 37,6 x 27,8 cm

sign. num.

Auflage ca. 175 Exemplare

Corlett 276

[23333]


Biography

Roy Lichtenstein

Roy Fox Lichtenstein (Manhattan, New York 1923–1997 Manhattan, New York) is – together with Andy Warhol – probably the most famous representative of American Pop Art. His Benday dots and Brushstroke works are world-famous, as are his motifs borrowed from the world of art, comics and consumption. His works have become icons of twentieth century art.

In 1961, Lichtenstein painted his first Pop images, for which he transferred cartoon figures from comic books and chewing gum wrappers directly onto canvas, albeit with small but revealing changes.

He experimented a great deal and imitated industrial printing techniques. The phenomena of industrial mass production and mass media advertising techniques became sources of inspiration. They fascinated him, but at the same time expressed his critical approach to them. Instead of coloured surfaces, he juxtaposed equally-sized coloured dots. These ‘Benday dots’ – named after the American artist and inventor Benjamin Day, who developed them for industrial illustrations – became Roy Lichtenstein’s trademark in both painting and printmaking. In addition to the typical Benday dots, the schematised system of lines and surfaces is also characteristic of his work.

Everything depicted is strongly stylised and limited by strong black outlines. The details are reduced to the minimum. Sculpturally modelled interior drawing is almost completely missing. As a result, but also due to the monochrome colour areas and the neutral background, the motifs appear very flat. Everyday actions and utilitarian objects are monumentalised. The persons depicted lack any individuality.

And it is almost always typical things, well-known through countless reproductions and clichés, that Lichtenstein chooses as the basis of his pictures: appropriated from art history and comics or everyday life.

In 1995, he was awarded the Kyoto Prize, one of the highest awards for services to science and culture.


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